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Category: Data Platform

I’m a data geek :) In fact, I like data so much that I have made it my career! I work with Azure Data and the Microsoft Data Platform, focusing on Data Integration using Azure Data Factory (ADF) and SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS).

In this category, I write technical posts and guides, and share my experiences with certification exams. You can also find a few interviews with Azure and SQL Server experts!

Azure Data posts cover topics like Azure Data Factory, Azure SQL Databases, Azure Data Lake Storage, and Azure Synapse Analytics. Microsoft Data Platform posts may cover topics like SQL Server, T-SQL, and SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS). You may even find the occasional Power BI post in here!

Table Partitioning in SQL Server – Partition Switching

This post is part 2 of 2 in the series Table Partitioning in SQL Server
Partition Switching

Inserts, updates and deletes on large tables can be very slow and expensive, cause locking and blocking, and even fill up the transaction log. One of the main benefits of table partitioning is that you can speed up loading and archiving of data by using partition switching.

Partition switching moves entire partitions between tables almost instantly. It is extremely fast because it is a metadata-only operation that updates the location of the data, no data is physically moved. New data can be loaded to separate tables and then switched in, old data can be switched out to separate tables and then archived or purged. All data preparation and manipulation can be done in separate tables without affecting the partitioned table.

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Using a Numbers Table in SQL Server to insert test data (T-SQL Tuesday #65)

T-SQL Tuesday

T-SQL Tuesday #65 is hosted by Mike Donnelly (@SQLMD). There is no specific topic to write about this month, Mike simply wants us to learn something new and then write a blog post to teach it to others. I want to share something that I only recently learned, something I wish I had known about years ago, something that became part of my toolbox as soon as I discovered it: the Numbers Table. It is so simple and solves so many problems that everyone should know about it :)

A Numbers Table (perhaps most known as a Tally Table, sometimes called an Auxiliary Table of Numbers and even referred to as the Swiss Army Knife of SQL Server) is a one-column helper table that contains the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and so on all the way up to the-highest-number-you-could-possibly-need.

It can be used to replace slower loops and row-by-row operations with faster set-based operations, generate dates, split strings, find gaps in data sets, expand data sets, insert test data and probably hundreds of other things. There are so many great and detailed articles already published about this topic, so I will stick to the T-SQL Tuesday topic of “Teach Something New” and share the two most recent things I learned: different ways to create a numbers table, and different ways to quickly insert test data by using a numbers table.

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Table Partitioning in SQL Server – The Basics

This post is part 1 of 2 in the series Table Partitioning in SQL Server
SQL Server Table Partitioning Cheat Sheet

There are many benefits of partitioning large tables. You can speed up loading and archiving of data, you can perform maintenance operations on individual partitions instead of the whole table, and you may be able to improve query performance. However, implementing table partitioning is not a trivial task and you need a good understanding of how it works to implement and use it correctly.

Being a business intelligence and data warehouse developer, not a DBA, it took me a while to understand table partitioning. I had to read a lot, get plenty of hands-on experience and make some mistakes along the way. (The illustration to the left is my Table Partitioning Cheat Sheet.) One of my favorite ways to learn something is to figure out how to explain it to others, so I recently did a webinar about table partitioning. I wanted to follow that up with focused blog posts that included answers to questions I received during the webinar. This post covers the basics of partitioned tables, partition columns, partition functions and partition schemes.

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Preparing for and taking exam 70-461 (Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012)

Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA): SQL ServerOne of my goals is to become a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert: Business Intelligence. I decided to start from scratch and take the three exams required for Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA): SQL Server 2012 to learn as much as possible. It has taken me a lot longer than I thought it would and I’m not there yet, but I’m one step closer to my goal: I passed the 70-461 exam (Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012) in January :)

Preparing for the exam
My plan was to work my way through each chapter in the Training Kit book. I read each chapter and answered the quick check questions, lesson review questions, and case scenarios out loud to myself. I did all the exercises, but none of the suggested practices. Instead, I tried to use what I had learned at work. For example, I rewrote some of our queries to use the new window functions, and it was easier to understand how FOR XML worked when I queried data I was already familiar with.

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Why I Will Not Take a Microsoft Online Exam Again

Disclaimer: I will not try to take a Microsoft Online Exam again – until they fix or change their exam software.

Why I Will Not Take a Microsoft Online Exam Again

I heard about Microsoft Online Exams in 2015 and found out they were available in Norway. I immediately wanted to try it! Taking an exam online would allow me to schedule it during the weekend so I didn’t have to take time off work. It also meant I saved 2-3 hours of travel time on a day.

Reviews of the exam process were both good and bad. Some had technical difficulties and had to reschedule, some had technical difficulties and failed their exam, while others had no problems at all and were very happy. I decided to give it a go.

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