Stop assuming wrongly and start assuming responsibility (T-SQL Tuesday #56)

T-SQL TuesdayT-SQL Tuesday #56 is hosted by Dev Nambi (@DevNambi) and the topic is assumptions: Your assignment for this month is to write about a big assumption you encounter at work, one that people are uncomfortable talking about. Every team has an elephant in the room. What happens if these big guesses aren’t true?

Stop assuming wrongly
“If you make an assumption, you suppose that something is true, sometimes wrongly.”

We’ve all assumed wrongly at some point. While it’s not always a big deal, sometimes the result can be disastrous. I’ve accidentally deleted all the weekly data in our production data warehouse because I assumed wrongly. (Thank goodness my assumption that we had working backups was correct!)

Most of the time I’m not aware that I make assumptions until something goes wrong, like when I realized I had deleted all that data. That’s when I stop and ask myself why I didn’t ask more questions, why I didn’t do more research, why I didn’t triple-check the logic?

The answer to why I assume wrongly is usually time. In the world of business intelligence there are just not enough hours in a day. When a business user asks for new data or a new report, their answer to “when do you need it?” is usually “yesterday”. We all want to deliver as much as possible in the shortest amount of time, which often leads to everyone making some kind of assumption without actually being aware of it. Business users assume IT knows all the business rules (“that’s supposed to be a negative amount”), IT assumes the business users have specified all requirements in detail (“that’s not in the requirements”), and we don’t take the time to sit down and go through it together.

Which leads me to my next point:

Start assuming responsibility
“If someone assumes responsibility, they begin to have responsibility.”

We need to take our time to collaborate, to ask those questions, to do that research and to triple-check that logic. Don’t assume that everyone else knows what you know, but share your knowledge. Don’t just assume that things work, but see how you can improve them. Work together.

I’ll start with me and make this a goal for me at work :)

Who is Cathrine Wilhelmsen?

Cathrine is a Microsoft Data Platform MVP, BimlHero, author, speaker, blogger and chronic volunteer who loves teaching and sharing knowledge. She works as a consultant, technical architect and developer, focusing on Data Warehouse and Business Intelligence projects. She loves sci-fi, chocolate, craft beers, ciders, cat gifs and smilies :)

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